Home Life style

0 31

Aventador S proved unwavering and full of heart, its performance easy to exploit on a whim.

From 8:30 AM Friday till late Monday, I pounded this bright blue 740-horsepower Lamborghini Aventador S around Southern California, its V12 and gearbox, logic-driven cockpit electronics, and in particular its impeccable build quality ending forever the decades-long trope about finicky Lamborghinis. It was as bulletproof as the Huracán that claimed a Daytona 24-Hour class victory the same weekend.

Bodywork is carbon-fiber, aluminium, and SMC. Chassis is carbon-fiber tub and alloy rails front and rear.

Crazy as it might sound, Aventador S is fully up to the task of romantic weekend trips to our Santa Barbara wine country, or twice-daily blasts to lunch and dinner engagements. Under all circumstances, Aventador S proved unwavering and full of heart, its performance easy to exploit on a whim.

Quilted leather seats highly supportive. Leather-trimmed dash. Audi-derived electronics have expected layers of menus and sub-menus so it’s to set up AC and audio before a trip, or have a friendly copilot.

No matter that steeply raked Lamborghini windshield and knock-on effect of radically low roof rails, the car demands limited compromise of median-height drivers. At six three, I was the only person who had to Lambo Limbo into the car, yet I executed a classic Steve McQueen entry a few times when my stiff, old neck cooperated. Passengers performed a deep knee bend beside the car before swinging hips over the nearly foot-wide sill, then ducked head down while falling backward into the quilted leather bucket. Seatback aggressively tilted, I viewed the world through the top third of the windshield; everyone else looked through the center portion of the screen, a major accomplishment in human factors for a car so dramatically styled.

The 6.5-liter V12 presented like jewelry, crackle-finish paint, gorgeous carbon-fiber X-brace. Note four massive air inlets feeding the air boxes. This engine gulps huge quantities of air and fuel. In lower right, note oil filler cap, which leads to a big alloy dry sump. Engine and sump hold more than 3 gallons of oil.

In SPORT setting, the 4-wheel drive system delivers up to 90 percent of torque to the rear wheels, yet Aventador S wastes little energy spinning tires at launch. Full-throttle acceleration smears the landscape in your peripheral vision, all the while singing Pavarotti Tenor between 4000 and 8500 rpm. Yes, you read that correctly: at 6.5 liters, nearly 400 cubic inches, this V12 revs effortlessly to 8500 rpm.

Carbon-ceramic brakes of staggering proportions, necessary for a car of this weight and speed potential. 15.75 in. front, 14.96 in. rear. Car stands just under 45 inches tall.

Yet it’s not just sprints starting from low speeds that compress and jostle organs located in the torso. Aventador S accelerates in shocking fashion coming out of a big bowled corner, or when it’s time to pass on the highway. The engine simply doesn’t run out of steam, and gear ratios are well chosen. After taking the whip on the highway, gulping gallons of fossil fuel and cubic yards of air, engine idle settles to 900 rpm, like an Audi A5 that’s just completed the drive home from the yoga studio. The 21st Century may bring the supposed freedom of autonomous cars, but it has also brought the materials, low-volume production techniques and electronics to make a car as flat-out crazy as Aventador S into damn near a daily driver.

Steering has minimal assist. Power flowing to front wheels gives a reassuring sensation when the hammer is down, full throttle.

The first exotic to crunch the newly laid gravel drive that leads to our garden, Aventador S performed tight, efficient J-turns thanks to its newly added rear-wheel steer function. Add the rear camera that projects onto the main gauge pod’s flat screen and the PARKING plan view presentation in the center console screen provided by an array of sensors and you will never, ever be that guy in the wild car who backs into a stanchion or big planter or another car under the port-cochère of a fine hotel. When driving something this outrageous, suffering the slings and arrows of the jealous is not a good time. In low-speed maneuvers, you will sense the massive front tires struggling with sharp turning angles, but Aventador S can be placed on a dime without two attendants standing alongside indicating how close you are to the curb.

Rear tires measure 355/25ZR-21. New head of Lamborghini Centro Stile, Mitja Borkert, wanted to quote the rear wheel arch of Marcello Gandini’s Countach. A sliver of bodywork was cut away, leaving a black plastic vent and insert that at a few paces disappears. Trompe l’œil.

Preferred calibration setting in the new EGO mode (you can select individual settings for steering, powertrain and suspension) was SPORT for steering and powertrain, and the softish STRADA setting for suspension. SPORT suspension calibration was best for smooth mountain two-lanes. For the choppy highways of Los Angeles, frankly, STRADA could be several ticks plusher, or Lamborghini could offer a pushbutton that for a brief period of time softens the damping when really rough roads are encountered. The front-end lift is mandatory, lifting the carbon-fiber front chin spoiler several inches in mere seconds, affording smooth entry to steep driveways like mine.

Gauges set for CORSA. Black box behind dash sourced from technology partner Audi.

Aventador’s 7-speed is not a dual-clutch German-style gearbox with virtually instantaneous gear changes. It’s a single clutch that pop-pops at the back, robotic arms shifting the cogs. Like manually shifting an old Lamborghini Diablo—I was on the press launch of that car and remember heaving the shifter—there is a slight pause between gears.

Magneto-rheological shocks lay horizontally, connecting to hubs with pushrods—racing tech that helps packaging.

Any vehicle this extreme will have eccentricities. For low-speed trawling through either my beloved beach neighborhood, or equally beloved Old Town Pasadena, it’s best to engage automatic gearbox mode in maneuvers below 10 mph to ensure smooth, easy operation. Simply put, this is a car meant to be driven with speed and style and a foot deep in the throttle; it is far happier in triple digits than taxiing at 5 mph. In parking garages or when making a splashy entrance, switch to automatic and the whole drivetrain settles down, happy to toddle along.

Trunk swallows two brief cases plus slim overnight bags. Shelf behind the seats holds jackets. Take a thick wallet to buy what you need at the Belmond Encanto Santa Barbara. Have your favorite winery ship a case—there’s no room for hauling wine.

Next, anyone standing much taller than my six foot three should consider commissioning a custom driver’s chair with Lamborghini’s ad personam atelier to gain a little head and leg room. I found a seating position comfortable for a long highway run (after two hours in the saddle, refueling and a leg stretch are advised), but I am clearly at outer limits for height.

From the rear, Aventador S looks like a 22nd Century Miura Interstellar Space Pod. Every approach to the car is as good as the first meeting.

Aventador S is about 85 percent Italian and 15 percent German. Every touch surface, every sound, every form of contact is screaming, yowling, erotically Italian yet with none of the heartaches and pain characteristic of Lamborghini before VW Group arrived in Sant’Agata. German technology means well sorted black boxes powering the electronic interface and monitoring the engine, a steering column with a wide range of adjustment, heated seats that work perfectly, a sensor array to aid parking, black boxes that make the engine flawless from idle to redline, and a rear-wheel steering motor sourced from the other premium brands within the VW Group, all hidden under the surface where no one cares. Aventador S is almost as easy to live with as baby brother Huracán, which is almost as easy to live with as an Audi TT.

Aventador and Huracán are  design masterworks of Filippo Perini, who guided Lamborghini Centro Stile before moving to the top spot at Italdesign. Mitja Borkert has respectfully evolved Perini’s Aventador. Borkert’s vision for Lamborghini is seen in Terzo Millennio EV concept developed with input from MIT.

Chief engineer Maurizio Reggiani and his new partners at Lamborghini, design boss Mitja Borkert and CEO Stefano Domenicali, enjoy tremendous latitude in engineering and design and…spirituality. By keeping hands off while offering access to the corporate parts bin, VW has allowed the boys of Sant’Agata to fulfill Ferruccio Lamborghini’s vision of a tough, fast, reliable and sexy Super GT with just enough practicality for a long weekend in Rimini or Santa Barbara, or a 2 AM blast to Vegas. Aventador S is the most spectacular Lamborghini ever conceived.

Rear wing rises at speed. The upright rear window allows a surprisingly good view to the rear. Side mirrors offer a broad swath view of real estate to the rear, too.

Steering wheel blocks view of light switches on left-side dash. With familiarity, they’re operated by touch.

Aventador.

0 44

L’ultimo nato di casa Microtech è un portatile ultrasottile dal design elegante e deciso. Si può scegliere il sistema operativo di bordo

Da qualche giorno c’è un nuovo ultrabook in città, un gadget realizzato in Cina ma che per una volta nasce vicino a casa. È e-book Pro, primo notebook dell’italiana Microtech, che in realtà disegna e fa realizzare apparecchi in ambito mobile da diversi anni ma che ancora non si era lanciata in questa categoria di prodotto. Progettato in Italia e assemblato in Oriente secondo le indicazioni degli ingegneri del gruppo, e-book Pro è un dispositivo che fa di eleganza e design aggressivo il suo biglietto da visita.

La scocca è costruita nella resistente nella durevole lega di alluminio-magnesio serie 5000 sottoposta a trattamenti di anodizzazione e spazzolatura, mentre lo spessore massimo del dispositivo è di appena 13 millimetri. Il gadget, insomma, si fa notare anche da chiuso. Una volta aperto rivela un display full hd con diagonale da 14,1 pollici non touch e basato su tecnologia lcd, incastonato in una cornice dai bordi laterali che arrivano ad appena tre millimetri di larghezza. Dal punto di vista dell’esperienza d’uso Microtech ha puntato su un’ampia tastiera con retroilluminazione regolabile su tre livelli, dotata di tasti con corsa da 0,7 millimetri e supportata da un touchpad prodotto da Elan secondo le specifiche Microsoft Precision Touch.

Al cuore del gadget ci sono una batteria da 5000 mAh che dovrebbe garantire un’autonomia di circa nove ore di utilizzo medio e processori Intel di settima generazione differenti a seconda della versione acquistata. La prima, in commercio già a partire da questi giorni, include un sistema Celeron Serie N supportato da 6 gb di ram.

Leggi anche

Le altre due arriveranno sugli scaffali a partire da giugno e includeranno processori Intel Core M3-7Y30 o i5-7Y54 affiancati da 8 gb di ram. Tutti e tre i modelli saranno muniti di 32 gb di memoria emmc e da 60, 120 o 240 gb di stoccaggio ssd opzionale. Quest’ultimo si potrà ulteriormente espandere nel tempo, sostituendo i moduli posti subito sotto la scocca del dispositivo e facili da raggiungere.

Tra le caratteristiche più interessanti di e-book Pro c’è però la possibilità di scegliere quale sistema operativo avere a bordo già al primo utilizzo: il gadget si può infatti acquistare con Windows 10 ma anche con Linux nella sua distribuzione Ubuntu. Chiudono il cerchio un comparto audio che si compone di un doppio microfono e di quattro altoparlanti invisibili posizionati nella cerniera tra tastiera e display, di un lettore di impronte digitali sul touchpad nonché di una dotazione di porte più che adeguata, che comprende due ingressi usb 3.0, uno slot per schede microsd, un’uscita micro-hdmi per il collegamento di uno schermo aggiuntivo e uno slot per jack audio da 3,5 millimetri.

I prezzi delle versioni più avanzate del gadget non sono ancora stati comunicati, mentre l’edizione di e-book Pro con processore Intel Celeron è già disponibile a partire da 399 euro per la versione con sistema operativo Ubuntu, da 419 euro con Windows 10 Home e da 459 euro con Windows 10 Professional.

Vuoi ricevere aggiornamenti su questo argomento?

Segui

Licenza Creative Commons

This opera is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

0 60

In honor of its limited edition RS2 Avant, Audi is launching a special edition Nogaro iteration of its RS6 Avant. Like 2014’s RS4 Nogaro edition, this revised station wagon features the special blue hue and quality detailing.

With each automobile accompanied by a plaque, only 150 Nogaro RS6 Avant models will be produced. Those who manage to get their hands on one will enjoy the Performance version of the car, which offers 553 lb-ft of torque and 605 horsepower. However, customers can opt for a power upgrade from Abt Sportsline, Audi’s racing partner, to boost hoursepower up to 705 and torque to 649 lb-ft. With a choice of black or blue interior, the car offers carbon-ceramic brakes, dynamic steering and a sports differential, ensuring a smooth ride.

Take a good look at the photos above — the release is Europe-only, meaning that none of the limited Nogaro RS6 Avant cars will hit American shores for now. Still, fans of luxury performance vehicles can anticipate Mercedes-AMG’s latest G63.

0 39
(Foto: Getty Images)
(Foto: Getty Images)

Google contro il panico: nel codice di Google Maps beta per Android è saltata fuori un’opzione che permetterebbe di conoscere i livelli di batteria del telefono insieme all’invio della posizione.

La possibilità di condividere la propria posizione (corrente e non) è una delle funzioni più pratiche dell’app per la navigazione di The Big G. La possibilità rendere visibile una forbice sul livello di batteria rimanente (fornire la percentuale precisa è impossibile, viste le variabili che incidono sulla tenuta) può aiutare chi sta dall’altra parte a non mettersi in allerta se il conducente non risulta più raggiungibile, o se tarda a rispondere.

La frase sul display potrebbe suonare così: “Il livello di batteria di Brian va dal 50% al 75%, e sta caricando“. Ovviamente, questo dipende dalla volontà dell’utente, che potrebbe non autorizzare la comunicazione del dato.

Tra le nuove possibilità svelate dall’analisi di AndroidPolice, ci sarebbe anche una funzione dedicata alle scorciatoie e al trasporto pubblico e quella di screenshot interna all’app, con tanto di pulsante nelle schede dei luoghi.

Leggi anche

Vuoi ricevere aggiornamenti su questo argomento?

Segui

Licenza Creative Commons

This opera is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

0 28

There was a bit of cringing in the standing-room-only crowd in one of
the larger Columbia University halls when the Russian Presidential
candidate Ksenia Sobchak spoke there last Thursday. A wave of discomfort
washed over the room when Sobchak said, “Russia is the biggest European
nation,” and added, “We are Europeans, we are not Asians.” Another wave
came after an audience member noted that Sobchak has risked alienating
voters by voicing support for L.G.B.T. people and even same-sex
marriage; Sobchak lamented that Russian television would surely now
disregard all the serious topics that had been discussed that evening,
and focus instead on the frivolous topic of L.G.B.T. rights.

Aside from those moments, though, the audience loved Sobchak, the
thirty-six-year-old television personality whose name will appear on the
ballot in the Presidential election, or what passes for a Presidential
election, on March 18th. One after another, graduate students, Russia
scholars, and Russian exiles congratulated Sobchak for her courage. The
outcome of the exercise known as the election is preordained—Vladimir
Putin, who has been in power for more than eighteen years, will gain
another six-year mandate—but Sobchak has been using her campaign to
speak out about taboo subjects, including Russian political prisoners.
She even went to Grozny, the capital of Chechnya, to draw attention to
the case of Oyub Tetiev, a human-rights activist who was arrested on
what appear to be falsified drug charges. That brought her praise from
some Russian activists and journalists who had been skeptical of her
campaign.

It’s easy to be skeptical. Sobchak is a woman, blond, wealthy, of
reality-television fame, and she has a close family connection to Putin.
Her father was Anatoly Sobchak, the first post-Soviet mayor of St.
Petersburg, who, back in 1990, hired a K.G.B. officer named Vladimir
Putin to be his deputy. The relationship lasted. Working in the shadow
of his charismatic boss, Putin accumulated wealth and power. When the
St. Petersburg city council suspected Putin of embezzlement and demanded
a prosecution, the mayor disbanded the city council. In 1996, Sobchak
lost his bid for reëlection. Soon after, he became the object of an
investigation into the misuse of funds and city property, and his former
deputy helped him leave the country. In 1999, Putin emerged from
obscurity as the Prime Minister and likely next President—and within a
few months he helped his former boss return from exile. In February,
2000, Sobchak suddenly died, and Putin, then acting President, cried at
his funeral. All this is well known, as is the fact that no one gets on
the ballot in Russia without Putin’s permission. In fact, his best-known
opponent, the anti-corruption activist Alexey Navalny, has been denied a
spot—and has called for a boycott of the election in protest. It would
follow that Putin put Ksenia Sobchak on the ballot.

Up close, Sobchak is a bit more complicated. I have observed her for
more than ten years, and have interviewed her on a few occasions. In
2011, when mass protests broke out in Russia, I watched her join the
demonstrations. She seemed to develop a political conscience overnight.
It was like watching someone grow a new limb: she seemed surprised but
determined, or resigned to changes in herself that she couldn’t control.
She gave up a lucrative career on state television. After the protests
ended and the political crackdown began, she was subjected to threats
and at least one highly public and humiliating police search of her
apartment. She became a host on a Web-based opposition television
channel. In 2015, death threats compelled her to leave the country for a
couple of months.

For a while now, Sobchak told me last Thursday, she has been working on
a film about her father. She kept asking Putin for an interview, and he
finally granted one this fall. She used the opportunity to tell him that
she had decided to challenge him in the election. She said that he
wasn’t pleased.

Here is where one has to bring up two long-standing rumors: the one
about the baptism, and the one about the death. There exists a photo of
Putin with Ksenia’s parents, taken, apparently, right after
twelve-year-old Ksenia had been belatedly baptized. There have been
persistent rumors that Putin is Ksenia’s godfather. She has said that he
is not: Putin attended the baptism but had no formal role in it. (She
also told me that she had submitted to the baptism solely to please her
mother.) The other rumor concerns Ksenia’s father. Anatoly Sobchak had
been campaigning for Putin when he died, of an apparent heart attack.
The details are weird; the witnesses—two former K.G.B. officers who were
accompanying Sobchak on the trip—are dead, both of gunshot wounds.
Ksenia’s mother, a senator, has said that she knows the truth about her
husband’s death but doesn’t feel safe disclosing it. Some people believe
that Sobchak was killed in advance of Putin’s first Presidential
election because he knew too much.

Ksenia Sobchak had a generally understanding attitude toward Putin. “I
think he is a patriot,” she said. “I think he sees himself as holding
Russia together through superhuman effort—and yet not letting it slide
into some sort of a military-junta situation.” Putin has stretched,
re-interpreted, and altered the Russian constitution to allow himself to
stay in power for as long as he has, but Sobchak believes that, after
another six-year term, he will be looking for a way to step down. And
then he will need a successor.

Is that the position Sobchak is angling for? She demurred, saying that she was still an inexperienced politician. But a second later she became
animated. “That’s the tragedy of our country,” she said. “Everyone is an
inexperienced politician.” She confessed that she wants to become the
kind of politician who enjoys both the confidence of those with power
and the trust of those who oppose Putin.

Even assuming that this strange construction could be plausible, why
would Putin choose Sobchak to be his successor? The answer is simple: he
could trust her to protect him from prosecution the way that he once
protected her father. She believes that Putin would want to leave
office, if only his personal safety and the security of his wealth could
be guaranteed.

Of course, that assumes that Putin isn’t going to try to stay in office
indefinitely—and that he didn’t give an order to kill Sobchak’s father.

And what about those rumors? Sobchak believes that Putin is not a
murderer: political murders that take place in Russia with some
regularity are, in her opinion, the work of zealous supporters, rather
than the execution of explicit orders. And back in 2000, she said, Putin
did not yet have those kinds of zealous supporters. “I’m aware of those
ideas,” Sobchak told me, about the whispers that Putin had her father
killed. “But that’s just unthinkable. If that is true, then the world is
an entirely different place than I imagine.”

0 34





<!– Article content: Dopo lo scandalo delle molestie sessuali, Oxfam ha annunciato un piano contro gli abusi. Per sorvegliare sulle azioni degli operatori umanitari e contrastare violenze e discriminazioni verr istituita una commissione indipendente con diritto d’indagine. Un piano presentato da una delle pi grandi organizzazioni internazionali al mondo, dopo le accuse, seguite a un’inchiesta del Times, di stupri, festini hard e giri di baby prostitute ad Haiti ma anche in altri Paesi. Una denuncia a cui seguito anche il coming out di Medici Senza Frontiere, che ha scelto di ammettere pubblicamente di avere ricevuto 146 denunce, solo nel 2017, relative a discriminazioni e abusi che in 24 casi su 40 si sono rivelati a sfondo sessuale. Una situazione che sta stravolgendo il mondo degli aiuti internazionali, modificando, forse in maniera irreparabile, la percezione comune e dei donatori in prima persona, dell’operato delle organizzazioni umanitarie. Per capire cosa sta succedendo davvero, l’abbiamo chiesto a una delle principali esperte in materia, la giornalista olandese Linda Polman che gi nel 2009 aveva portato alla luce gli aspetti pi oscuri del mondo degli aiuti umanitari, nel suo libro Lindustria della solidariet. Aiuti umanitari nelle zone di guerra(Mondadori) e ancora prima aveva affrontato il tema nel saggio,Onu. Debolezze e contraddizioni di unistituzione indispensabile per la pace(Sperling Kupfer 2003). Per prima cosa ci ha detto che non affatto sorpresa. Come mai? Conosco Haiti abbastanza bene, ci sono andata la prima volta nel 1993. Ho visto le organizzazioni umanitarie lavorare in quel territorio e casi simili ci sono sempre stati. Cos come accade in Africa e in Asia. Perch succede? Prendiamo Haiti come esempio. C’ un terremoto e molte organizzazioni vanno sul posto, Oxfam una delle cinque pi grandi al mondo, ha un budget di centinaia di migliaia di dollari da spendere ogni anno. Insieme a lei, ci sono altre grandissime Ong che arrivano nello stesso Paese, come per esempio Msf e Save The Children. Ognuna di queste apporta un enorme ammontare di denaro. Quanto? Basti pensare che nel primo anno dopo il terremoto, ad Haiti le Ong avevano 9.5 bilioni di dollari da spendere, che pi di quanto il governo locale possedeva. Ecco da dove viene tutto il potere che hanno gli aiuti umanitari, cos come i governi che le sostengono economicamente. E questo in che modo influisce sulle persone, quindi sugli operatori umanitari? come uno stato parallelo che subentra ad Haiti. Tra gli operatori c’ la sensazione di essere quelli che hanno pi potere, si sentono come i capi della zona. come dire noi abbiamo i soldi e dovete fare quello che diciamo noi”. Infine, a livello personale, gli operatori vanno in situazioni molte povere, dove ci sono guerre e dove molto spesso non c’ la polizia che viene e porta via i cattivi. C’ l’idea di essere davvero pi forti. Lei ha visto situazioni di abusi? Certo, ad Haiti ho visto grandi hotel aperti subito dopo il terremoto, grandi ristoranti, grandi casin. Ho visto baby prostitute dentro questi locali. Infine non sono solo questi gli abusi. Pu farci esempi? Un altro aspetto drammatico quello per esempio dei bambini portati via dagli orfanotrofi. Vengono presi da persone bianche e nessuno sa dove vanno o chi siano. il commercio di bambini. Perch solo oggi si parla di questi scandali in maniera pi decisa? Le Ong hanno cercato fino ad oggi di tenere tutto nascosto per non avere grandi problemi con i donatori, come sta succedendo ad Oxfam con il governo britannico. Dallo Stato Oxfam riceve ogni anno pi di 300 milioni di euro, quindi non pu deluderlo. Ecco perch si nascondono gli abusi. Nel 2008 fu Save The Children a documentare le violenze dei caschi blu, non solo ad Haiti. Oltre cento soldati vennero mandati a casa perch gestivano bordelli e giri di prostituzione. Qual , secondo lei, il vero problema del sistema degli aiuti internazionali? Il business, si tratta di aziende da bilioni di dollari e ognuna vuole essere la migliore. Ricevono molte pressioni in questo senso, perch cercano sempre di ottenere pi fondi e sono obbligate a spendere milioni di dollari ogni anno. Per esempio dopo un terremoto Oxfam deve inviare immediatamente, entro 24 ore, persone sul posto per le ricerche, ci che i donatori richiedono. Questo che conseguenze ha? Significa non valutare bene le persone che selezionano e inviano sul posto.Per esempio l’uomo belga accusato in questi giorni, era gi stato licenziato da altre Ong per lo stesso motivo. Non sono incoraggiati a verificare che le persone lavorino bene piuttosto a nascondere i problemi quando li scoprono. Portano avanti anche progetti importanti per le popolazioni pi vulnerabili del mondo. S, lo fanno, ma credo profondamente che se vogliamo un mondo migliore l’aiuto internazionale non sia la soluzione. Ci sono troppe Ong, troppe agende da rispettare, troppi governi donatori coinvolti.Le Ong vanno dove i governi le inviano e questi ultimi le mandano dove hanno interessi militari, come per esempio accade in Afghanistan o in Siria. Poi ci sono gli interessi economici, come per esempio il petrolio in Sudan. tutto guidato dall’economia, non c’ etica? Non vengono fatte scelte etiche bens economiche, il 75% dei soldi delle Ong non va ai poveri, ma ai Paesi in cui i governi hanno interessi. necessario essere critici e sapere che le Ong non sono Madre Teresa di Calcutta, Haiti in questo senso un esempio eccellente. In che modo? uno di quei Paesi che riceve aiuti umanitari da 50 anni, ma rimasto il pi povero nell’emisfero occidentale. Ad Haiti vengono spesi centinaia di milioni di dollari, ma dove vanno i soldi? Perch Haiti non si sviluppa? Non lo sappiamo. Per questo penso che l’industria degli aiuti internazionali non sia la soluzione migliore per aiutare e far progredire i Paesi. Anche Msf si autodenunciata in questi giorni. Sentiremo di molte altre Ong. Di Msf dobbiamo dire una cosa importante: hanno fatto coming out non perch sono stati messi sotto pressione dai media, ma perch hanno ritenuto importante farlo, questo che dovremmo incoraggiare. Dopo questi scandali, cambier il mondo degli aiuti? Possono cambiare solo se lo decidono loro davvero. Il grande problema che girano 130 bilioni di dollari ogni anno, le ong sono pi di 37 mila. Non collaborano tra loro, hanno i loro progetti, ecco perch non sappiamo quanti abusi ci sono, per esempio. Dovremmo spingere le Ong a scambiare informazioni tra loro, ad essere sincere ma non sono ottimista in questo senso. Come pu un piccolo donatore scegliere l’Ong giusta? Noi non smetteremo mai di donare perch ne abbiamo bisogno, ci fa stare bene.Le Ong ci fanno vedere in tv i bambini che muoiono di fame, circondati dalle mosche e noi vogliamo fare davvero qualcosa. Adesso possiamo scegliere di non dare soldi a Oxfam, ma ad altri. Mi preme sottolineare che dobbiamo smettere di essere pigri, smettere di dare 10 euro e pensare di essere a posto. Dovremmo informarci, leggere dei Paesi in cui le Ong lavorano, essere pi consapevoli e coinvolti anche sotto l’aspetto politico. Dovremmo sapere cosa fanno i nostri Paesi, l’Italia un grande donatore, ma sono sicura che molti italiani non sanno dove vanno a finire questi soldi. [cn_read_more title="Accuse alle ong, Msf:Politici, venite in mare con noi" url="https://www.vanityfair.it/news/approfondimenti/2017/04/29/ong-polemica-msf-soccorsi-intervista"] –>

<!– The content: Dopo lo scandalo delle molestie sessuali, Oxfam ha annunciato un piano contro gli abusi. Per sorvegliare sulle azioni degli operatori umanitari e contrastare violenze e discriminazioni verr istituita una commissione indipendente con diritto d’indagine.

Un piano presentato da una delle pi grandi organizzazioni internazionali al mondo, dopo le accuse, seguite a un’inchiesta del Times, di stupri, festini hard e giri di baby prostitute ad Haiti ma anche in altri Paesi. Una denuncia a cui seguito anche il coming out di Medici Senza Frontiere, che ha scelto di ammettere pubblicamente di avere ricevuto 146 denunce, solo nel 2017, relative a discriminazioni e abusi che in 24 casi su 40 si sono rivelati a sfondo sessuale.

Top stories

Una situazione che sta stravolgendo il mondo degli aiuti internazionali, modificando, forse in maniera irreparabile, la percezione comune e dei donatori in prima persona, dell’operato delle organizzazioni umanitarie.

Per capire cosa sta succedendo davvero, l’abbiamo chiesto a una delle principali esperte in materia, la giornalista olandese Linda Polman che gi nel 2009 aveva portato alla luce gli aspetti pi oscuri del mondo degli aiuti umanitari, nel suo libro Lindustria della solidariet. Aiuti umanitari nelle zone di guerra(Mondadori) e ancora prima aveva affrontato il tema nel saggio,Onu. Debolezze e contraddizioni di unistituzione indispensabile per la pace(Sperling Kupfer 2003).

Per prima cosa ci ha detto che non affatto sorpresa.

Come mai?
Conosco Haiti abbastanza bene, ci sono andata la prima volta nel 1993. Ho visto le organizzazioni umanitarie lavorare in quel territorio e casi simili ci sono sempre stati. Cos come accade in Africa e in Asia.

Perch succede?
Prendiamo Haiti come esempio. C’ un terremoto e molte organizzazioni vanno sul posto, Oxfam una delle cinque pi grandi al mondo, ha un budget di centinaia di migliaia di dollari da spendere ogni anno. Insieme a lei, ci sono altre grandissime Ong che arrivano nello stesso Paese, come per esempio Msf e Save The Children. Ognuna di queste apporta un enorme ammontare di denaro.

Quanto?
Basti pensare che nel primo anno dopo il terremoto, ad Haiti le Ong avevano 9.5 bilioni di dollari da spendere, che pi di quanto il governo locale possedeva. Ecco da dove viene tutto il potere che hanno gli aiuti umanitari, cos come i governi che le sostengono economicamente.

E questo in che modo influisce sulle persone, quindi sugli operatori umanitari?
come uno stato parallelo che subentra ad Haiti. Tra gli operatori c’ la sensazione di essere quelli che hanno pi potere, si sentono come i capi della zona. come dire noi abbiamo i soldi e dovete fare quello che diciamo noi”. Infine, a livello personale, gli operatori vanno in situazioni molte povere, dove ci sono guerre e dove molto spesso non c’ la polizia che viene e porta via i cattivi. C’ l’idea di essere davvero pi forti.

Lei ha visto situazioni di abusi?
Certo, ad Haiti ho visto grandi hotel aperti subito dopo il terremoto, grandi ristoranti, grandi casin. Ho visto baby prostitute dentro questi locali. Infine non sono solo questi gli abusi.

Pu farci esempi?
Un altro aspetto drammatico quello per esempio dei bambini portati via dagli orfanotrofi. Vengono presi da persone bianche e nessuno sa dove vanno o chi siano. il commercio di bambini.

Perch solo oggi si parla di questi scandali in maniera pi decisa?
Le Ong hanno cercato fino ad oggi di tenere tutto nascosto per non avere grandi problemi con i donatori, come sta succedendo ad Oxfam con il governo britannico. Dallo Stato Oxfam riceve ogni anno pi di 300 milioni di euro, quindi non pu deluderlo. Ecco perch si nascondono gli abusi. Nel 2008 fu Save The Children a documentare le violenze dei caschi blu, non solo ad Haiti. Oltre cento soldati vennero mandati a casa perch gestivano bordelli e giri di prostituzione.

Qual , secondo lei, il vero problema del sistema degli aiuti internazionali?
Il business, si tratta di aziende da bilioni di dollari e ognuna vuole essere la migliore. Ricevono molte pressioni in questo senso, perch cercano sempre di ottenere pi fondi e sono obbligate a spendere milioni di dollari ogni anno. Per esempio dopo un terremoto Oxfam deve inviare immediatamente, entro 24 ore, persone sul posto per le ricerche, ci che i donatori richiedono.

Questo che conseguenze ha?
Significa non valutare bene le persone che selezionano e inviano sul posto.Per esempio l’uomo belga accusato in questi giorni, era gi stato licenziato da altre Ong per lo stesso motivo. Non sono incoraggiati a verificare che le persone lavorino bene piuttosto a nascondere i problemi quando li scoprono.

Portano avanti anche progetti importanti per le popolazioni pi vulnerabili del mondo.
S, lo fanno, ma credo profondamente che se vogliamo un mondo migliore l’aiuto internazionale non sia la soluzione. Ci sono troppe Ong, troppe agende da rispettare, troppi governi donatori coinvolti.Le Ong vanno dove i governi le inviano e questi ultimi le mandano dove hanno interessi militari, come per esempio accade in Afghanistan o in Siria. Poi ci sono gli interessi economici, come per esempio il petrolio in Sudan.

tutto guidato dall’economia, non c’ etica?
Non vengono fatte scelte etiche bens economiche, il 75% dei soldi delle Ong non va ai poveri, ma ai Paesi in cui i governi hanno interessi. necessario essere critici e sapere che le Ong non sono Madre Teresa di Calcutta, Haiti in questo senso un esempio eccellente.

In che modo?
uno di quei Paesi che riceve aiuti umanitari da 50 anni, ma rimasto il pi povero nell’emisfero occidentale. Ad Haiti vengono spesi centinaia di milioni di dollari, ma dove vanno i soldi? Perch Haiti non si sviluppa? Non lo sappiamo. Per questo penso che l’industria degli aiuti internazionali non sia la soluzione migliore per aiutare e far progredire i Paesi.

Anche Msf si autodenunciata in questi giorni.
Sentiremo di molte altre Ong. Di Msf dobbiamo dire una cosa importante: hanno fatto coming out non perch sono stati messi sotto pressione dai media, ma perch hanno ritenuto importante farlo, questo che dovremmo incoraggiare.

Dopo questi scandali, cambier il mondo degli aiuti?
Possono cambiare solo se lo decidono loro davvero. Il grande problema che girano 130 bilioni di dollari ogni anno, le ong sono pi di 37 mila. Non collaborano tra loro, hanno i loro progetti, ecco perch non sappiamo quanti abusi ci sono, per esempio. Dovremmo spingere le Ong a scambiare informazioni tra loro, ad essere sincere ma non sono ottimista in questo senso.

Come pu un piccolo donatore scegliere l’Ong giusta?
Noi non smetteremo mai di donare perch ne abbiamo bisogno, ci fa stare bene.Le Ong ci fanno vedere in tv i bambini che muoiono di fame, circondati dalle mosche e noi vogliamo fare davvero qualcosa. Adesso possiamo scegliere di non dare soldi a Oxfam, ma ad altri. Mi preme sottolineare che dobbiamo smettere di essere pigri, smettere di dare 10 euro e pensare di essere a posto. Dovremmo informarci, leggere dei Paesi in cui le Ong lavorano, essere pi consapevoli e coinvolti anche sotto l’aspetto politico. Dovremmo sapere cosa fanno i nostri Paesi, l’Italia un grande donatore, ma sono sicura che molti italiani non sanno dove vanno a finire questi soldi.

LEGGI ANCHE

Accuse alle ong, Msf:Politici, venite in mare con noi

#bannerInRead {display:none !important;}

adsJSCode(“bannerInRead”, [565,333], “”, “”);

–>

Dopo lo scandalo delle molestie sessuali, Oxfam ha annunciato un piano contro gli abusi. Per sorvegliare sulle azioni degli operatori umanitari e contrastare violenze e discriminazioni verrà istituita una commissione indipendente con diritto d’indagine.

Un piano presentato da una delle più grandi organizzazioni internazionali al mondo, dopo le accuse, seguite a un’inchiesta del Times, di stupri, festini hard e giri di baby prostitute ad Haiti ma anche in altri Paesi. Una denuncia a cui è seguito anche il coming out di Medici Senza Frontiere, che ha scelto di ammettere pubblicamente di avere ricevuto 146 denunce, solo nel 2017, relative a discriminazioni e abusi che in 24 casi su 40 si sono rivelati a sfondo sessuale.

Top stories

Una situazione che sta stravolgendo il mondo degli aiuti internazionali, modificando, forse in maniera irreparabile, la percezione comune e dei donatori in prima persona, dell’operato delle organizzazioni umanitarie.

Per capire cosa sta succedendo davvero, l’abbiamo chiesto a una delle principali esperte in materia, la giornalista olandese Linda Polman che già nel 2009 aveva portato alla luce gli aspetti più oscuri del mondo degli aiuti umanitari, nel suo libro L’industria della solidarietà. Aiuti umanitari nelle zone di guerra (Mondadori) e ancora prima aveva affrontato il tema nel saggio, Onu. Debolezze e contraddizioni di un’istituzione indispensabile per la pace (Sperling Kupfer 2003).

Per prima cosa ci ha detto che «non è affatto sorpresa».

Come mai?
«Conosco Haiti abbastanza bene, ci sono andata la prima volta nel 1993. Ho visto le organizzazioni umanitarie lavorare in quel territorio e casi simili ci sono sempre stati. Così come accade in Africa e in Asia».

Perché succede?
«Prendiamo Haiti come esempio. C’è un terremoto e molte organizzazioni vanno sul posto, Oxfam è una delle cinque più grandi al mondo, ha un budget di centinaia di migliaia di dollari da spendere ogni anno. Insieme a lei, ci sono altre grandissime Ong che arrivano nello stesso Paese, come per esempio Msf e Save The Children. Ognuna di queste apporta un enorme ammontare di denaro».

Quanto?
«Basti pensare che nel primo anno dopo il terremoto, ad Haiti le Ong avevano 9.5 bilioni di dollari da spendere, che è più di quanto il governo locale possedeva. Ecco da dove viene tutto il potere che hanno gli aiuti umanitari, così come i governi che le sostengono economicamente».

E questo in che modo influisce sulle persone, quindi sugli operatori umanitari?
«È come uno stato parallelo che subentra ad Haiti. Tra gli operatori c’è la sensazione di essere quelli che hanno più potere, si sentono come i capi della zona. È come dire “noi abbiamo i soldi e dovete fare quello che diciamo noi”. Infine, a livello personale, gli operatori vanno in situazioni molte povere, dove ci sono guerre e dove molto spesso non c’è la polizia che viene e porta via i cattivi. C’è l’idea di essere davvero più forti».

Lei ha visto situazioni di abusi?
«Certo, ad Haiti ho visto grandi hotel aperti subito dopo il terremoto, grandi ristoranti, grandi casinò. Ho visto baby prostitute dentro questi locali. Infine non sono solo questi gli abusi».

Può farci esempi?
«Un altro aspetto drammatico è quello per esempio dei bambini portati via dagli orfanotrofi. Vengono presi da persone bianche e nessuno sa dove vanno o chi siano. È il commercio di bambini».

Perché solo oggi si parla di questi scandali in maniera più decisa?
«Le Ong hanno cercato fino ad oggi di tenere tutto nascosto per non avere grandi problemi con i donatori, come sta succedendo ad Oxfam con il governo britannico. Dallo Stato Oxfam riceve ogni anno più di 300 milioni di euro, quindi non può deluderlo. Ecco perché si nascondono gli abusi. Nel 2008 fu Save The Children a documentare le violenze dei caschi blu, non solo ad Haiti. Oltre cento soldati vennero mandati a casa perché gestivano bordelli e giri di prostituzione».

Qual è, secondo lei, il vero problema del sistema degli aiuti internazionali?
«Il business, si tratta di aziende da bilioni di dollari e ognuna vuole essere la migliore. Ricevono molte pressioni in questo senso, perché cercano sempre di ottenere più fondi e sono obbligate a spendere milioni di dollari ogni anno. Per esempio dopo un terremoto Oxfam deve inviare immediatamente, entro 24 ore, persone sul posto per le ricerche, è ciò che i donatori richiedono».

Questo che conseguenze ha?
«Significa non valutare bene le persone che selezionano e inviano sul posto. Per esempio l’uomo belga accusato in questi giorni, era già stato licenziato da altre Ong per lo stesso motivo. Non sono incoraggiati a verificare che le persone lavorino bene piuttosto a nascondere i problemi quando li scoprono».

Portano avanti anche progetti importanti per le popolazioni più vulnerabili del mondo.
«Sì, lo fanno, ma credo profondamente che se vogliamo un mondo migliore l’aiuto internazionale non sia la soluzione. Ci sono troppe Ong, troppe agende da rispettare, troppi governi donatori coinvolti. Le Ong vanno dove i governi le inviano e questi ultimi le mandano dove hanno interessi militari, come per esempio accade in Afghanistan o in Siria. Poi ci sono gli interessi economici, come per esempio il petrolio in Sudan.

È tutto guidato dall’economia, non c’è etica?
«Non vengono fatte scelte etiche bensì economiche, il 75% dei soldi delle Ong non va ai poveri, ma ai Paesi in cui i governi hanno interessi. È necessario essere critici e sapere che le Ong non sono Madre Teresa di Calcutta, Haiti in questo senso è un esempio eccellente».

In che modo?
«È uno di quei Paesi che riceve aiuti umanitari da 50 anni, ma è rimasto il più povero nell’emisfero occidentale. Ad Haiti vengono spesi centinaia di milioni di dollari, ma dove vanno i soldi? Perché Haiti non si sviluppa? Non lo sappiamo. Per questo penso che l’industria degli aiuti internazionali non sia la soluzione migliore per aiutare e far progredire i Paesi».

Anche Msf si è autodenunciata in questi giorni.
«Sentiremo di molte altre Ong. Di Msf dobbiamo dire una cosa importante: hanno fatto coming out non perché sono stati messi sotto pressione dai media, ma perché hanno ritenuto importante farlo, è questo che dovremmo incoraggiare».

Dopo questi scandali, cambierà il mondo degli aiuti?
«Possono cambiare solo se lo decidono loro davvero. Il grande problema è che girano 130 bilioni di dollari ogni anno, le ong sono più di 37 mila. Non collaborano tra loro, hanno i loro progetti, ecco perché non sappiamo quanti abusi ci sono, per esempio. Dovremmo spingere le Ong a scambiare informazioni tra loro, ad essere sincere ma non sono ottimista in questo senso».

Come può un piccolo donatore scegliere l’Ong «giusta»?
«Noi non smetteremo mai di donare perché ne abbiamo bisogno, ci fa stare bene. Le Ong ci fanno vedere in tv i bambini che muoiono di fame, circondati dalle mosche e noi vogliamo fare davvero qualcosa. Adesso possiamo scegliere di non dare soldi a Oxfam, ma ad altri. Mi preme sottolineare che dobbiamo smettere di essere pigri, smettere di dare 10 euro e pensare di essere a posto. Dovremmo informarci, leggere dei Paesi in cui le Ong lavorano, essere più consapevoli e coinvolti anche sotto l’aspetto politico. Dovremmo sapere cosa fanno i nostri Paesi, l’Italia è un grande donatore, ma sono sicura che molti italiani non sanno dove vanno a finire questi soldi».

LEGGI ANCHE

Accuse alle ong, Msf:«Politici, venite in mare con noi»

More



Libri

Sally Rooney, l’amica brillante al tempo dei millennial



Donne nel mondo

Letizia Pezzali: «Quello stretto rapporto tra sesso e finanza»



Cinema

Kristin Scott Thomas: «Adesso voglio uomini adulti»

0 41

We often ask ourselves Can I look really, really, really stylish while wearing leggings? Mostly because the thought of giving up the comfort of our favorite athleisure piece keeps us awake at night. Leggings are now so much more than the stretchy pants we wear to yoga class, they’ve taken on new shapes, doubling as trousers (treggings, anyone?), becoming office-approved, and sparking controversial trends left and right. Have you ever tried to wear leggings as pants? We have a few thoughts on the matter. Which is why we set out to prove that seriously cool outfits with leggings exist—and they’re oh so good. Read on if you’re ready to achieve peak levels of comfort and style.

0 40

Spoiler alert: The following information about how much money you’re blowing on Uber rides is alarming and kind of depressing. If you want to stay blissfully in the dark, then by all means, do. But consider yourself warned.

According to a new analysis from Betterment, an investment service, Uber rides cost the average 20-something more than $300,000 over a 25-year period, reports Money. Not direct costs, mind you, but the amount of money you could’ve made if you didn’t Uber and instead invested that fare. The exact amount of money you’d make if you invested your Uber fare? $323,190. Whew.

To be fair, this analysis is based on an ambitious investment portfolio: 90 percent in stocks and 10 percent in bonds, with about 8 percent return over time. But the returns on a less aggressive portfolio with 60 percent in stocks and 10 percent in bonds would still be $235,000 over 25 years, which isn’t shabby at all. (How much have you lost in crypto this month?)

If all those hundreds of thousands of dollars seem too good to pass up, delete the rideshare app and replace it with an investment one—there are plenty to choose from. At the very least, call one less Uber a week. On average, you’d save $1,140 a year. And think of all the happy hour beers you could invest that cash into.

STAY CONNECTED